Not at all. If anything, the dangers of rising sea level have been understated because the most recent science shows that the Greenland and Antarctic ice caps are melting faster than expected.

Although sea level rose by 120 m (390 ft) at the end of the last ice age, since then it remained more or less constant until the late 19th century. During the 20th century sea level began to rise at 1.7 millimetres (0.07 inches) per year and satellite measurements show that since 1993 the rate has been around 3 millimetres (0.12 inches) per year. Sea level is rising faster today, first, because climate change is warming the oceans which are therefore expanding, and second, because ice on land in parts of the Antarctic and Greenland and ice in glaciers is melting. The melting of Arctic sea ice and Antarctic ice shelves, which float in the ocean, does not contribute directly to sea level rise. However the destruction of ice shelves may indirectly contribute to sea level rise by removing a barrier which slowed the flow of ice from western Antarctic glaciers into the sea.

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (2007) reported that in the period 1993-2003 thermal expansion and melting land ice contributed about equally to the rise. Although locally there may be a net accumulation of ice and snow in some parts of the Antarctic and Greenland, resulting from increased snow fall, on average there is a net loss. In 2009 one scientist reported ‘As a result of the acceleration of outlet glaciers over large regions, the ice sheets in Greenland and Antarctica are already contributing more and faster to sea level rise than anticipated. If this trend continues, we are likely to witness sea level rise one meter or more by year 2100’. If sea level rose by 1 m (3.3 ft) globally it would affect over 100 million people and submerge over one million square kilometres (400,000 square miles) of land. It is certain that rising seas will adversely affect coastal states; the question is, how soon and to what extent will it do so?